About your Search

20121226
20130103
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13
heart or follow the base instincts? >> host: think you. >> host: john jackson, jr. professor of africana studies at it ever since pennsylvania and author of "racial paranoia" the unintended consequences of political correctness". dr. jackson talking about "racial paranoia" who is paranoid? >> guest: we're all paranoid when it comes to race. for good reason. one point* that i make as a category itself is about the way we look at social life. some better so paramount we have to be on the lookout at all times. so race itself is about vera and social paranoia. but think about the country like the united states we could have 2 miles -- mottoes. try to build a community but the other is post ratio of the by oppression. don't say a word. that is a very different project but they're both under that umbrella. >> host: go to the second example to ignore or not talk about race. >> it is important not to make a fetish but the danger is to imagine that is not already in the room. so we have to be careful to bracket out serious discussions is it is a historical position. that the only way to move forw
in the administration of the andrew jackson. first key helped taney become the u.s. attorney general and then the secretary of the treasury and then in 1836, the chief justice of the supreme court. roger tawney went on to right the dred scott digs in the 1857 which effectively legalized slavery and hastened the coming of the civil war. to key and tawnye were inseparable and influential and important in a way totally forgotten. in washington there is key bridge which crosses the potomac river, right by where it is a park that where key used to live, his house. in the park there is lots of exhibts devoted to him. and there is one that says key was active in anti-slavery causes. and this is flat wrong. it is completely wrong. it would be much more accurate to say key was active in suppressing anti-slavery causes. part of the point of this book to remind people of all the things we really don't want to remember about our own history. so this is a book, also a book about the real francis scott key. but i don't want to give the wrong impression. this book is not a polemical book. it is not
was in jackson mississippi earlier last month on the fifth of the sixth book event, downtown jackson, middle-class mixed-race african-american and white audience, maybe 30 or 40. i'd told them the arc of my story and then we went into a question and answer period for 20 or 30 minutes. a little bit of a the larger room than this here. an african-american woman in the second row back, knew she wanted to say something and i wound down and i said are there any more questions? she shot her hand up and she said yes, i want to say something and i don't know how i can say it. i said i think i have enough nerve to say but it but i want to thank you for coming. i didn't know if she meant that morning or 50 years ago. she said let me tell you my story. i was growing up in vicksburg and daddy told us that night to stay in the house and stay away from the windows. there is trouble out on the street. it was not a good time for blacks in vicksburg and it was not a good time for blacks to be in the state of mississippi. that weekend, i had faith in only two things, god and the united states army. that momen
. >> host: professor john jackson, jr. "racial paranoia" the unintended consequences of political correctness." this is a booktv on c-span2. >> host: booktv on c-span2 is on vacation the university of pennsylvania at philadelphia. at the school of communication and joining us is the dean michael x. delli carpini. dean, what is the school of communication? >> a freestanding school that does research for the public consumption and a scholarly work and a ph.d. training and undergraduate training the way media communications influence social, political, a health and cultural practices. >> host: we're here specifically to talk about your book "after broadcast news" if media regimes, democracy, and the new information environment." but it seems for the last 20 or 30 years we have been debating "after broadcast news" scenario. how do you assess it? >> guest: we try to put it into historical context. the basic argument is over the last 20 years some changes have been slow or quick that are changing the way in where we get public affairs information. the three big changes are the bullring
scheme by which they had mirrored at registered in jackson. and then we have barnett at the football game that very day, standing up, giving this speech calling to resist the journey of the federal government. so he has nullification and interposition. >> he seems to have so like a cheap suit on the telethon. [laughter] to but he really didn't. that is what led the president to stand in. federal troops and national guard. >> one of my favorite stories about president kennedy is the was supposed to say to an equally bad segregationist, i don't care if you denounce me in public. just don't you dare do it in private. [laughter] >> that's interesting. robert kennedy says these were the first in the situation. >> that's right. it is the first in the civil rights museum. watching people listen to governor barnett, at least now that he can no longer do any harm. the next tape involves a subject that we love, but space program. but it is what a real president sounds like. this is president kennedy meeting in 1962. one year and a half after he made the announcement in the state of the union speech
the northeast side of the square and he went halfway to jackson. so a few buckets were available but the brigade had the can best boxes and container that held water and he used his hat. i try to keep this short. i personally love every part of this book. so, it's always a little bit detailed. my drawings which i'm proud of, we didn't use them all but - and you can probably see the of millions of lines and i am pretty strict when i work i don't like to -- if i make a mistake i do it over. it's a bit of a bug. let's see if i can find what i like to read one of the things that is unusual to says what they look like in the times and of course a year in a snap one of the pictures they really like to go with a drawing so we did that and i just thought there is one actually i can't find it this is my favorite person in the book. usually they are symbolic. the docks are down. i drew the docks of 1860 and linked the stories. i think my favorite part and i won't bore you with it but 20 gives a speech about the future of san francisco they hired him to laugh at the right spot the part of the speech i love
we went out with us and percy jackson series, read: time. at the end of the summer, jack was a bright guy, but was not a big reader and a good-looking kid -- his mother must be very, very pretty. but by the end of the summer, he had read a dozen books. about nine of them he liked a lot in his reading skills have gone to remove. so he went from eight yourself or he didn't like to read two when he took his sats, which they take, he got 800 reading, which is the highest score you can get. so that's what can happen. it's unimportant whether they get 800 or harvard or vanderbilt , the support they get through high school and they have options when they get out. so yeah, mitch, where are you? , now, we're going to shoot the breeze and awesome question. what happened with that movie, et cetera, et cetera. [applause] >> so i think you can also why we have a master storyteller a mischievous measure in the story that he tells. i think we need to create on this throughout the country. we read in our house. i think that is one of the most brilliant taglines that i've heard in a long,
of the square and rose halfway to kearney on jackson. so few buckets were available that the brigade had to use canvas sacks, boxes and any container that held water. broderick -- >> and we leave this now, we're going to take you back live to the floor of the senate. to begn with. there is still significant distance between the two sides, but negotiations continue. there is still time left to reach an agreement, and we intend to continue negotiations. i ask unanimous consent that the senate now proceed to a period of morning business for debate only with senators permitted to speak for up to ten minutes each. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. reid: mr. president, we're going to come in at 11:00 a.m. tomorrow morning. we'll have further announcements perhaps at 11:00 in the morning. i certainly hope so. the presiding officer: the senior senator from connecticut is recognized. mr. lieberman: i thank the chair. mr. president, i guess the good news is that i'm rising today not to speak about the fiscal cliff, but what i'm speaking about is not good news because it deals with
as failures our at least not very successful guys, and that would be andrew jackson higgins, who produced an incredible number of craft, landing craft, but after the war was kind of out of business, but especially we look at people like howard hughes. howard hughes is viewed as a giant failure during world war ii because he doesn't produce any weapons that work. everybody knows about the spruce goose. he produces the wooden reconnaissance airplane, very fast but they are really use before the end of the war. this is the whole point. people like howard hughes where necessary so that we could have people like henry kaiser. it's only because you have the failures that you know what doesn't work. every time something doesn't work you know not to go there. and so it's because we have this, and other countries did not, they insisted that you win every time or you die. that's going to cause a problem down the line. that's no different than europe. the german miracle of economic production was, in fact, a faÇade. supported by mass conscription that eliminated unemployment, but by 1934 and early
in the quantity of hard news in favor of fluff news, that the news media spends more time on what michael jackson had, you know, than what happens with mitt romney. comment? >> first of all i'm delighted you're an avid abc news watcher. listen, people have asked me about where the news is heading and what's happening. it's changing. going back to your contact book, seeing how much it changed while walter cronkite was there. a change certainly very much and it will continue to change and evolve. i continue to watch abc news, not so much as a user, but you watch and there's always material that i think as you scrape it is also things that are different than would've been when i was there. something i learned abc news is if you want more substantive, whatever you want more of, you hold it within your power to influence the. because no matter who the journalist, no matter how they all react to the audience. they do care. there is great news reporting being done there is outlets, electronically whether it is online or tv or radio, great news reporting being done right now. if you want more of that, th
of interviews from the university of pennsylvania. fishesz, at 1 p.m., we talk with john l. jackson, jr., the unintended consequences of political correctness. at 1:30, we hear about "after broadcast news: media regime, democracy, and the new media information environment." watch these programs and more all weekend long on booktv. visit booktv.org for a complete schedule. >>> next on booktv, the former deputy assistant secretary of commerce argues that the u.s. is and will continue to be a leader in manufacturing and innovation. it's about 45 minutes. ♪ >> thank you. thank you for the very kind introduction. it's a real honor to be at politics and prose, such an institution to the city, and it's really a pleasure to be here. thank you to everyone for coming out on an august evening to hear me. i will try to be brief in my comments, and i would rather have more of an exchange of ideas and hear your perspective and so that we can have a conversation about manufacturing and what our country should do to be competitive. the book, the idea for the book came above when i was traveling aroun
responsible for helping them in st. philip's and jackson stop the fleet but neither the parts of the confederate fleets stopped them in that defense sweep they were sunk in by the union navy and moved up past the parts and captured and new orleans. then montgomery moved up with to take command of i think eight upper supposed to defend memphis in the confrontation with the western on june 6, 1862 including some unions that were yclept. they had reinforced and the idea is they would ram the enemy. the union had some of its own in the interesting command with no time to go into that. but the upshot of what happened in manteca memphis june 6, 1862 is seven out of eight of the confederate ships were sunk and were captured in that conflict, too said montgomery as you said in his defense of the mississippi river has two different union fleets. spikelets what this gentleman here. >> my name is mark. i'm a member of the society here. i would like to ask a question about something i've always been curious about. and that's the relationship between the captain and ulysses grant in connec
in the music industry and worked with michael jackson and prince and bob marley
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)